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Exercises developing spatial orientation

Shaping spatial orientation begins from the first moments of a child’s life. Babies explore the plane, learn to function in it, cross the midline of the body. This process, although long and often not easy, is necessary for their proper and harmonious development. The only way to get to know space on all its planes is to move – play, experience, experiment.

Younger preschool children gradually develop their spatial orientation. First, they learn to name and point to the different parts of their body. Then they can define directions from its axis, ie “forward”, “backward”, “to the side” and indicate the place of the object in relation to their own body, ie “above me”, “below me”, “in front of me”, ” behind me ”,“ next to me ”and older children“ on my right side ”,“ on the left side ”. The next stage is orientation in space in relation to another person or object – for example, “The balloon is above Ana”. The last skill important in achieving school readiness is orientation on a sheet of paper.

The child involuntarily shapes its spatial orientation in the course of everyday activities. There are many simple games and exercises that can help him do this.

 

  1. Know your body schema.

Game suggestions:

– Greeting with specific parts of the body, 

Head, shoulders, knees and toes

Knees and toes

Head, shoulders, knees and toes

Knees and toes

And eyes, and ears, and mouth, and nose

Head, shoulders, knees and toes

Knees and toes

 

  1. Orientation in space in relation to one’s body.

Game suggestions:

– Placing the selected item, eg ball, mascot in a specific place, eg “Put the teddy bear on your right side / above you / below you / behind you / in front of you”.

– “To the goal.” We cover the child’s eyes. We lead them to their destination using verbal instructions, eg “two steps forward”, “one step left”, “three steps forward”.

 

  1. Orientation in space in relation to another person or object.

Game suggestions:

– “To the goal.” This time we are blindfolded and the child gives verbal instructions. It leads us to the designated goal, eg “two steps forward”, “one step left”, “three steps forward”.

– “What can I see?” We stand in front of the child. Please describe what he sees and then try to describe what we see.

– The Mirror. We stand in front of the child. We make various movements. Please copy them.

 

  1. Orientation on a sheet of paper.

Game suggestions:

– Playing with a piece of paper. Pointing and then marking the edges (top, bottom, right, left) of the page with the selected color.

– Completing pictures, eg “Draw a colorful flower under the tree”.

– “Spoken picture.” “In the upper left corner, draw (or form blocks) a sun with a cloud under it. Draw a house in the middle. ” Over time, descriptions can become more detailed. It will also allow you to practice concentration and memory, as well as listen carefully.

– “Graphic dictation”. Mark a point on the checkered sheet. Then we ask the child to draw according to our instruction, for example, “Two grids up, one square to the right.” As a result, we get a picture, e.g. a house.

 

Additional excellent, universal methods of developing spatial orientation in children are playing with mini waffles (arranging according to a pattern, verbal instructions, free games), arranging puzzles, tangrams, tetris cubes, mosaics, as well as various movement games, e.g. with a ball or overcoming an obstacle course.

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